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How to Get the Job (Part 1 of 3)

February 20/2006   Category: Features

We are constantly being reminded that the world moves at ever increasing speeds…we’re expected to work more efficiently as our computers get faster every other month. Cell phones, email, laptops and other mobile office tools force us to constantly juggle our personal and the professional lives. There’s very little time – who has time to eat, never mind look at resumes and portfolios?

Over the next few posts we’ll be sharing some inside info regarding presenting your work, discussing the importance of personal honesty when deciding if you meet a job’s requirements , and sharing our 10 major Do’s and Don’ts of the application process.

In our first post of this 3 part series we’re going to keep it simple.

There are 2 basic rules to keep in mind:

1) Your work must be be accessible (files you send have to open the first time) or it risks being pushed aside. If the applicant captures my interest in some creative or humorous way up front in the email– we might give the resume/portfolio a second chance in Explorer. Quite simply, make sure that what you’re sending is going to open and work– whether responding to a job posting or just sending an email on the fly. If nothing else, understand this: time is valuable, and limited. Nothing personal, we simply can’t invest the time troubleshooting your files.

Recently we posted a junior position. Appropriately enough 80% of the 300 plus applicants were students. We were looking for students, and anticipated them being ‘green’, but less than half linked to web portfolios. Of that 50%, most portfolio sites were either too slow, had missing links or simply didn’t load properly on a Mac. An unfortuante, but instant, disqualification

2) Your work must illustrate both creativity as well as commercial viability in order for us to consider you. Art and design, like music, is very subjective. What floats your boat might simply sound, or in this case look, weird or hoakey to others. We simply don’t have the time to appreciate the sublties of your off color work, regardless of the work’s brilliance.

Every company is different– these are the guidelines that we here at GoBig use when reviewing applicants. That having been said, when applying to any job your work should be easily viewable (i.e. files should open the first time and not require anything of us other than a double click to view them), and should display a sensitivity to both the creative and commercial aspects of design and branding.

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